Ancient Egyptian Snake Game Coloring Sheet

Snake Game
Snake Game

Hi, there! We’ve finished studying the early farmers and Old Kingdom Egypt. For both we made barley. It turns out my rice cooker that’s terrible for rice does a great job with barley if you set it on brown rice.

We also made and played Snake. Normally it’s made on a slab of clay with pebbles or little figures of gods and goddesses for pieces, but this one is printable and colorable. Click the picture below or this link to go to Flickr and download it.  I included some animal hieroglyphs to use as pieces if you want, but we used Monopoly pieces.

Egyptian Snake Game

You can use a die, a spinner or trivia/flash cards to run along the snake’s body from the mouth to the eye. Or you can color it to match Candyland and use those cards. It’s easy to get creative. We used the “Poster” setting in our printer properties to tile it on cardstock to make a bigger board.

Have fun!

 

Me and My Family Tree

Family Tree
Family Tree

We read “Me and My Family Tree” and turned it into a project. The girl in the book used crayon drawings of her relatives, but Sagan wanted words so I made a list, cut it apart and we stuck them on using the book as a guide. Sagan is an only child so we put him on the trunk to save space, and he has dozens of cousins so we only named the last two he played with to save our sanity. We made the branches with brown crayon and stuck hearts on to represent couples who are still married.

Cave Painting

A Boy and His Cat-Dragon
A Boy and His Cat-Dragon

Our latest history lesson was nomadic prehistory, so we studied some cave art and did a cave painting, of course.

This is, “A boy and his cat-dragon“, wax medium (ha! crayon!) and acrylic on crumpled packing material. He drew the figures with black crayon, dotted yellow and red ochre acrylic paint on with a wad of damp paper towel, and Mom went over his black lines on a light box to make them darker (and to make them show up where they were painted over) once the paint was dry.

He says it’s Toothless and Hiccup, but as cave men. That’s why the sabre-tooth doesn’t have any teeth.

We used red and yellow ochre because they were the most common paint colors of the ancient world. You could also add lamp black and unbleached titanium. If you just want the fun and you’re not an ancient pigment nerd like me, just use black, white, yellow or beige and orange-red or reddish brown. Or for the Crayola fingerpaint version: black, white, red and yellow.

Spring Egg Wall/Door Hanging

Spring Egg
Spring Egg

Here is a spring door or wall hanging for preschoolers. We used craft foam, brass fasteners, pony beads, scissors, a hole puncher, scrapbook paper, and the grownup used hot glue.

Kinda posting this because you’d think there would be more brass fastener crafts for preschoolers out there. If you’re looking for a step-by-step, you’ve come to the wrong blog, heh.  My only tip is to put the brass fasteners through the grass layer and to glue it on the egg so they don’t scratch your wall.

Recycled Celery Experiment, Part 1

This summer we decided to experiment with kitchen scrap gardening. These are two celery scraps from the same package, each cut an inch from the root. We used organic because it’s more likely to grow.

On May 13, we put one in a shallow bowl of water and the other we dipped in rooting hormone and planted in an equal soil mix of presoaked peat, organic compost and citrus/cactus potting mix. We covered it with about a half-inch of the soil mix.

Celery Stumps
Celery Stumps

Celery needs a lot of nutrients and good drainage, so that’s what I came up with from the bags in my garage. I have no idea if that’s proper or not, but I needed something for container gardening. It gets too hot here to grow celery this time of year so it needs to stay on my windowsill to keep it from bolting and turning bitter.

I didn’t think the one put in the soil was going to make it at first because the other one had an inch of leaves in a week, but it looks like the one planted in the soil was putting its initial energy into making roots because it really took off. On the other hand, the articles I read on rooting celery said you should see roots in a week if you put it in a bowl. We decided to give up waiting and gave it some rooting hormone and soil. Hopefully we’re not too late.

This is how they looked June 4.

Celery Stumps
Celery stumps three weeks later.

In theory, if they don’t bolt, you can cut off what you need when you want to eat it, or you can cut off the tops and bury the stumps in a little soil and start over again indefinitely. We may try blanching them with tubes of construction paper later.